ABBA SAUL


ABBA SAUL
ABBA SAUL, mid-second century tanna. Quoted frequently in the Mishnah and Tosefta, he was probably a disciple of R. Akiva (in view of the fact that he quotes several halakhot in his name; Tosef., Sanh. 12:10). Abba Saul was the colleague of R. Judah b. Ilai and R. Meir (Men. 11:5). He is not usually mentioned with other tannaim, nor are halakhot transmitted in his name by later tannaim (see abba guryon ). His terminology often differed from that normally used, not only in relation to burial tools (TJ, Shek. 8:2, 51a) but in other areas as well, so that, for example, one who was commonly called a shetuki ("one whose father is not known"), he calls beduki ("one requiring examination," Kid. 4:2). He often declared: "The rule is just the opposite" (Git. 5:4) indicating that his version of a tradition differed from that of other tannaim. Generally his opinion is quoted as an adjunct to a Mishnah (Sanh. 10:1; et al.). On the basis of these differences, it has been suggested that there was a different "Mishnah of Abba Saul," which Judah ha-Nasi had used. He transmitted traditions with regard to the pathology and growth of the human embryo (TJ, Nid. 3:3, 50d), and especially with regard to the structure and utensils of the Temple (Mid. 2:5; 5:4; Shek. 4:2; et al.). One of his few aggadic statements is his comment on "This is my God, and I will glorify Him" (Ex. 15:2), which he interpreted as meaning that man should strive to imitate God, endeavoring – like Him – to be gracious and merciful (Shab. 133b; Mekh., Shirah, 3). Later traditions suggest that his father's name may have been Nannos (ARN1 29, 87; cf. Nid. 24b, 25b), and his mother's Imma Miriam (Ket. 87a). The Talmud describes him as "the baker for the family of Rabbi (Judah ha-Nasi)" (Pes. 34a), but in another place his occupation was given as a gravedigger (Nid. 24b) and he described prevailing burial customs, reporting how a grave was located in the rock at Beth-Horon (Nid. 61a). -BIBLIOGRAPHY: Frankel, Mishnah, 186–7; I. Lewy, in: Berichte der Hochschule fuer die Wissenschaft des Judenthums in Berlin (1876); Hyman, Toledot, s.v.; Epstein, Tanna'im, 160–3. (Bialik Myron Lerner)

Encyclopedia Judaica. 1971.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Abba Jose ben Hanan — or Abba Jose ben Hanin (Hebrew; Aramaic: Abba bar Hanan) was a tanna who lived in Judea during the first century CE. His career spanned the last decades before the destruction of the Second Temple and was a contemporary of Eliezer ben Jacob and… …   Wikipedia

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  • ABBA — (Heb. אַבָּא), Aramaic equivalent of the Hebrew (av, אָב; father ). The term was in common use from the first century onward (cf. Mark 14:36). In the early centuries of the Christian era it was used in both Jewish and Christian sources in… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Saul (Begriffsklärung) — Der biblische Name Saul (lat.: Saulus) kommt aus dem Hebräischen ‏שָׁאוּל‎ Šā’ûl oder Scha ul und bedeutet „der Erbetete“ oder „der Erhabene“. Saul heißen: Saul, vierter König vom Stadtstaat Ja udi Saul, erster König von Israel Saul (Edom), König …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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  • DELMEDIGO, ELIJAH BEN MOSES ABBA — (c. 1460–1497), philosopher and talmudist. Born in Candia, Crete, Delmedigo was also known as Elijah Cretensis. While still a young man he immigrated to Italy. He received a traditional Jewish education, and studied the classics of Islamic and… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism


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